Full Circle
October 20, 2013

A&D

I recently got asked to be a guest speaker at the High School of Art & Design in NYC, it was a special honor for me since I graduated from the school back in 1995. The actual building that housed the old A&D I went to was demolished earlier this year, so I was given a full tour of the new school and facilities.
photo 1 photo 2Although I barely ever used them, nothing says art school like these little guys, lol.

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One of the coolest things that stuck out to me at the new High School of Art & Design was the tiling on one of the hallways, it’s a pixelated version of jimmy Palmiotti’s countdown 51 cover.  As you can see in the floor lay out above, Superman is clearly depicted on the hallway floor. For more pics of the new A&D click HERE, note: these are early work in progress pictures.
showsI’m usually so busy doing my art hustle thing, that I often over look how the animated projects I’ve worked influence younger artist coming up.  The three shows I’ve worked on that got the most reactions from the A&D animation students where “Batman The Brave and the Bold”, 4kids “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” and “codename: Kids Next Door”. It’s awesome to see the reactions from the demographic that they’re intended for first hand. I look forward to building and connecting more with the High School of Art & Design for future projects and lectures.

Pencil Mileage…
May 30, 2013

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When I was younger I use to focus on speed and pencil mileage when it came to drawing, this was drilled in us at SVA’s animation department. The mentality of it was…the more you draw, the more bad drawings you got out of your way before the good ones came along. I never questioned it, because at the time 2d animation was huge and it made total sense.

Years after graduation I came to the realization that pencil mileage, just like any other type of mileage needs focus and direction, otherwise you’re just driving in circles and not going anywhere.

Slow down, look at a map, study the options before hitting 90 mph. I learn to slow down and pay attention to what I was doing, I didn’t feel a need to fill up a sketchbook every week anymore. My sketchbooks became more of an exploration and study of where my lines could go and what they could form. I guess in short I am saying….pay attention to what you’re doing and stop rushing your work, it’s important to give it the attention it deserves.